Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
The Los Angeles Times gets a fully staffed “burner account”
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Sept. 20, 2013, 1:47 p.m.

It’s a new report from the essential Reuters Institute at Oxford, which leads the way in cross-national media studies today. PDF here. The big question is what’s the role of public television — PBS, BBC, CBC, NHK, and so on — in a world where media options are more numerous than ever? One noteworthy, if short, chapter is Joshua Gans’ “Television Wants to be Shared”:

My recent book Information Wants to be Shared (2012) puts forward the hypothesis that allowing consumers to share information easily can be an important feature of business models for content provision. The reasons are twofold. First, information, as an economic good, has a non-rival characteristic, meaning that the costs of producing information are independent of, and often much greater than, the costs of distributing it. This is certainly true of broadcasting where the size of the audience does not impact on the cost of providing programming. From an economic perspective, what this implies is that it is efficient for information, once produced, to be widely disseminated and that we should look for ways for all users to contribute towards the cost of producing that information. That widespread dissemination and voluntary choice to contribute to information funding can conflict is a challenge that does not diminish the aim here.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 60,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
The Los Angeles Times gets a fully staffed “burner account”
The first-of-its-kind team is offering “views, vibes, and commentary.”
“The differences seem to be growing”: A look at the rising generation of news consumers
Social natives ≠ digital natives.
The Washington Post wants to give you a good deal on a digital subscription — from now until 2072
Anyone who tells you they know what digital news will look like in 50 years is lying. But the Post — with an owner rich enough to allow a decades-long time horizon — says it’ll still only cost you $50 a year.