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How do audiences decide what news to trust? Fairness and accuracy aren’t the only things that matter
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Nov. 4, 2013, 10:58 a.m.
LINK: www.journalism.org  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   November 4, 2013

Also, fewer in number.

All that and more in a new Pew/Knight study based on survey data and a multiyear dataset of tweets around news events.

Lots of interesting numbers in there, but they add up to explain why Twitter is bullish about its advertising possibilities.

According to the survey, 16% of U.S. adults use Twitter. Among those, roughly half (52%) “ever” get news there — with news defined as “information about events and issues that involve more than just your friends or family.”

Mobile devices are a key point of access for these Twitter news consumers. The vast majority, 85%, get news (of any kind) at least sometimes on mobile devices. That outpaces Facebook news consumers by 20 percentage points; 64% of Facebook news consumers use mobile devices for news. The same is true of 40% of all U.S. adults overall, according to the survey.

Twitter news consumers stand out for being younger and more educated than both the population overall and Facebook news consumers.

Close to half, 45%, of Twitter news consumers are 18-29 years old. That is more than twice that of the population overall (21%) and also outpaces young adults’ representation among Facebook news consumers, where 34% are 18-29 years old. Further, just 2% of Twitter news consumers are 65 or older, compared with 18% of the total population and 7% of Facebook news consumers.

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