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The LA Times’ Kevin Merida thinks Los Angeles is “the perfect place to redefine the modern newspaper”
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Jan. 21, 2014, 1:20 p.m.
LINK: www.adweek.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   January 21, 2014

Lucia Moses at Adweek has the details:

Capital next month will start asking readers, following a free trial, to pay for its morning newsletters, customizable alerts and breaking news blasts. The annual fee for Capital’s three verticals — City Hall, Albany and media — will be $5,990 for up to five users after the paywall goes live. Eventually, Capital expects to sell each vertical separately.

With the media business struggling to shift its dependence from advertising to subscriber revenue, the Capital experiment will undoubtedly be watched closely.

Think of it as a New York version of Politico’s Pro product.

I tend to agree with Jim VandeHei that media will be the hardest of the three verticals to sell. But when it comes to state government (and a city government the size of New York City’s), a high-end, paid-subscription, granular-detail product strikes me as a no-brainer. If I were running a newspaper or smart online outlet that covered a state capital, I’d be launching a high-dollar premium product for lobbyists and their ilk too. Dollars by the thousand are better than dollars by the dozen, and there can be a lot of editorial rollover from the premium product to the standard one.

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