Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Newsonomics: Two years after launching a local news company (in an Alden market), here’s what I’ve learned
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Jan. 21, 2014, 1:20 p.m.
LINK: www.adweek.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   January 21, 2014

Lucia Moses at Adweek has the details:

Capital next month will start asking readers, following a free trial, to pay for its morning newsletters, customizable alerts and breaking news blasts. The annual fee for Capital’s three verticals — City Hall, Albany and media — will be $5,990 for up to five users after the paywall goes live. Eventually, Capital expects to sell each vertical separately.

With the media business struggling to shift its dependence from advertising to subscriber revenue, the Capital experiment will undoubtedly be watched closely.

Think of it as a New York version of Politico’s Pro product.

I tend to agree with Jim VandeHei that media will be the hardest of the three verticals to sell. But when it comes to state government (and a city government the size of New York City’s), a high-end, paid-subscription, granular-detail product strikes me as a no-brainer. If I were running a newspaper or smart online outlet that covered a state capital, I’d be launching a high-dollar premium product for lobbyists and their ilk too. Dollars by the thousand are better than dollars by the dozen, and there can be a lot of editorial rollover from the premium product to the standard one.

Show tags
 
Join the 60,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Newsonomics: Two years after launching a local news company (in an Alden market), here’s what I’ve learned
Eleven takeaways as Lookout Santa Cruz enters its third year.
Text-to-image AI is a powerful, easy technology for making art — and fakes
Deep fakes have already been used to create nonconsensual pornography, commit small- and large-scale fraud, and fuel disinformation campaigns. These even more powerful image generators could add jet fuel to these misuses.
The Washington Post launches a year in news à la Spotify Wrapped
“We initially built a ‘look-back’ experience but pivoted when we learned that our readers are more interested in insights that center on their reading ‘personality’ and content discovery rather than revisiting news from the past.”