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Why do some people avoid news? Because they don’t trust us — or because they don’t think we add value to their lives?
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May 21, 2014, 10:02 a.m.
Business Models
LINK: www.themediabriefing.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   May 21, 2014

Okay, not everybody. But while every British publication seems to be expanding to Australia (The Guardian, The Daily Mail), the Americans seem more interested in India, with recent launches or announcements of BuzzFeed India, Quartz India, Business Insider India. Henry Taylor at The Media Briefing looks at the numbers that show why: 125 million English speakers, for one.

Western media interest in India as a market isn’t new — see The New York Times’ India Ink, The Wall Street Journal’s involvement in Mint, and other earlier forays. But it’s noteworthy that BuzzFeed, Quartz, and Business Insider all produce content that’s very mobile-friendly, making them a natural match for a country where most Internet access happens on phones.

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