Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Facebook’s intentions may not be pure, but its money is real: How publishers made the most of its membership accelerator
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
May 21, 2014, 10:02 a.m.
Business Models
LINK: www.themediabriefing.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   May 21, 2014

Okay, not everybody. But while every British publication seems to be expanding to Australia (The Guardian, The Daily Mail), the Americans seem more interested in India, with recent launches or announcements of BuzzFeed India, Quartz India, Business Insider India. Henry Taylor at The Media Briefing looks at the numbers that show why: 125 million English speakers, for one.

Western media interest in India as a market isn’t new — see The New York Times’ India Ink, The Wall Street Journal’s involvement in Mint, and other earlier forays. But it’s noteworthy that BuzzFeed, Quartz, and Business Insider all produce content that’s very mobile-friendly, making them a natural match for a country where most Internet access happens on phones.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Facebook’s intentions may not be pure, but its money is real: How publishers made the most of its membership accelerator
“For some [publishers], this program will be a way to get a check. Some of them are going to pick up some ideas and tips and that’s the end of it. For some of them, it’s truly transformational in how they operate.”
Newsonomics: CEO Mark Thompson on offering more and more New York Times (and charging more for it)
The “failing” New York Times’ news operation now employs more than 1,700 journalists, up nearly 50 percent from a decade ago. It has nearly 5 million subscribers, triple its print-era peak. Now it’s preparing to up the price.
Nattering nabobs of news criticism: 50 years ago today, Spiro Agnew laid out a blueprint for attacking the press
“In his attacks on television news, Agnew struck a chord with conservatives who had long regarded the media with suspicion. Nixon later called Agnew’s speech a ‘turning point’ in his presidency.”