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March 11, 2016, 1:14 p.m.
Reporting & Production

The 24th-annual Malofiej Infographics World Summit took place in snowy Pamplona, Spain, this past week, with speakers including Archie Tse, senior graphics editor at The New York Times; Len De Groot, director of data visualization at The Los Angeles Times; and Monica Ulmanu, visual journalist for The Guardian, among others.

Malofiej happened to coincide with a mobile-design-heavy week here at Nieman Lab. On Monday, Ken Doctor wrote about The New York Times’ redesign of its smartphone app. “It’s information-dense, but not leaden,” he wrote. “In a scan or a scroll of the moment’s news, readers can get a broad sense of what it indeed is happening.” Doctor also interviewed Steve Duenes, the Times’ associate managing editor for graphics.

On Wednesday, we featured an excerpt from Alberto Cairo‘s new book The Truthful Art: Data, Charts, and Maps for Communication. (Cairo was also a presenter at Malofiej.)

And on Thursday, my colleague Shan Wang published a roundup of how publishers like NPR, The Wall Street Journal, and The Center for Public Integrity are reshaping their interactives for mobile devices.

In these stories, you’ll see echoed some of the themes from this year’s edition of Malofiej, and here are some tweets from the conference pulling these themes together. The Times’ Tse got particular buzz for his presentation, “Why We Are Doing Fewer Interactives.”

The show also included an awards ceremony, where The New York Times won “best in show” for its May 2015 online interactive “You Draw It: How Family Income Predicts Children’s College Chances.” You can see all of the award winners here.

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