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True Genius: How to go from “the future of journalism” to a fire sale in a few short years
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Dec. 1, 2016, 9 a.m.

The Knight Foundation on Thursday said it was giving a total of $455,000 to three journalism groups to launch new initiatives that are meant to improve journalism education and help news organizations share best practices.

The Institute for Nonprofit News, Investigative Reporters and Editors, and Local Independent Online News Publishers are the three organizations receiving funding from Knight. (Disclosure: Knight also supports Nieman Lab.)

Knight is granting $180,000 to INN to fund the creation of an online hub that will offer resources and training for outlets:

The hub will include lessons on strategic business planning, playbooks, case studies and more. In addition, the organization will introduce in-person training focused on increasing the business skills of nonprofit journalism leaders. The training sessions will focus on developing new approaches to audience engagement and revenue opportunities, while helping participants better apply data, mobile and social tools to advance their work.

LION, a membership organization for independent local news sites, is receiving $200,000 to hire a full-time executive director. The person hired for that role will help “strengthen and expand its peer-to-peer learning network, which helps independent journalists share best practices and develop their expertise in technology and business skills,” according to Knight’s announcement. LION will also use the funding to support its annual conference and other events.

IRE is receiving $75,000 to fund new programming at its conferences. It is also using the grant to support the Ida B. Wells Society, which works to increase the number of investigative journalists of color.

Knight’s full announcement is available here.

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