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Nothing against the “Death Star,” but the LA Times thinks its new daily news podcast can go where the biggies can’t
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Oct. 8, 2019, 10:37 a.m.
Audience & Social

Last year a group of small advertisers in California sued Facebook, claiming that it massively overestimated video ad viewing time (by as much as 900 percent) and failed to disclose the miscalculation once people inside the company had discovered it. During this period, company executives were also heavily promoting video at news industry events — contributing, as I argued last year, to publishers making disastrous “pivots to video” (soon followed by accompanying editorial layoffs) because they believed Facebook’s data was better than their own and that it showed a huge audience for news video waiting to be monetized.

That advertiser lawsuit has now been settled: The Hollywood Reporter reported Monday that Facebook agreed to pay the advertisers $40 million, though the company maintains it did nothing wrong.

Twitter, on the other hand, is, uh, less convinced of Facebook’s innocence in the matter — and many pointed out that while the advertisers are getting a (small, in Facebook terms) settlement, the journalists laid off in all that video-pivoting are getting nothing.

Separately, Facebook announced Tuesday that it’s giving $300,000 to European news publishers to help them experiment with video.

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Nothing against the “Death Star,” but the LA Times thinks its new daily news podcast can go where the biggies can’t
“When you say national, usually what that means is New York or D.C. We’re trying to read that so that the gravity is really coming out of Southern California and expanding outward from that.”
How The New York Times assesses, tests, and prepares for the (un)expected news event
Rather than hastily address issues in the months leading up to big events where we expected lots of reader traffic, we decided to take stock of our systems as a whole and enact longer term resilience measures.
I have come to bury Knewz, not to praise it
News Corp’s painfully named news aggregator promised to somehow battle “crass clickbait,” filter bubbles, media bias, and two trillion-dollar companies, all at once. It ended up being a D-minus Drudge clone and OnlyFans blog.