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Why do people still get print newspapers? Well, partly to start up the grill (seriously)
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May 14, 2018, 10:17 a.m.
LINK: www.canadalandshow.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   May 14, 2018

If you’re interested in Canadian media — and who among us is not — you probably already listen to Canadaland, the flagship show of Jesse Brown’s growing podcast empire, which dives into the nation’s journalism issues. I was happy to appear on the show to talk digital news strategy in 2016, and Jesse just had me back for today’s episode, where — contrary to the doom and gloom that accompanies most discussion of the technology’s impact on the media.

Well, I’m not going to say we avoided doom or gloom entirely — but we did get to have a fruitful discussion of some of the more tech-forward ways the industry is changing. In particular:

— Will blockchain meaningfully change the fundamental questions about how we journalism gets funded? (I’m skeptical.)

— Will AI and bots replace reporters? (Maybe on the fringes, but they’re mainly for scale and speed.)

— What is Apple News planning? (Dunno, but I’m hopeful the mobile OS companies can play a more useful role in news than Facebook does.)

It’s a fun conversation, and I hope you’ll give it a listen here.

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