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The Washington Post launches a year in news à la Spotify Wrapped
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Jan. 23, 2014, 2:10 p.m.
LINK: www.niemanlab.org  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   January 23, 2014

TORONTO — Everyone who’s heard me recite the list of Canadian prime ministers in reverse chronological order — I usually get tripped up somewhere around Arthur Meighen — knows I have a special place in my heart for our neighbors to the north. And Nieman Lab has lots of readers up here in Toronto — it ranks seventh in our traffic stats. (Behind NYC, London, Washington, San Francisco, Chicago, and L.A., but ahead of Boston, Sydney, Paris, Seattle, and Berlin.)

toronto-map

So I want to have a chance to meet some of you nice folks while I’m in town for tonight’s Canadian Journalism Foundation panel with some of Canada’s top news executives, which I’m moderating. (Top people from The Globe and Mail, the Toronto Star, Postmedia, and La Presse. The event is sold out, but at this writing there are still tickets available for the overflow room, and it’ll be livestreamed and later aired on CPAC, Canada’s version of C-SPAN.)

So if you’re a Toronto Nieman Lab reader, or just someone interested in the news business, come hang out with me and your peers at an impromptu Nieman Lab happy hour — after work Friday, January 24, at Bar Wellington (520 Wellington Street West). I’ll get there around 5 p.m. and stick around for at least a couple hours. No idea how many people will be joining us — could be 10, could be 40! — but come say hello and talk a little shop. (Look for us upstairs. I’ll try to, I dunno, carry a newspaper or something as a clue.)

First eight people to come up to me and repeat the magic phrase — Cyril Knowlton Nash — get a beer on me.

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The Washington Post launches a year in news à la Spotify Wrapped
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