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Nothing against the “Death Star,” but the LA Times thinks its new daily news podcast can go where the biggies can’t
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March 7, 2017, 11:59 a.m.
LINK: amphtml.wordpress.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joseph Lichterman   |   March 7, 2017

Three of the leading search engines in Asia said on Tuesday that they would begin supporting Google’s AMP pages.

Baidu, China’s largest search engine, and Sogou, another Chinese search engine, said that AMP pages would now show up in search results there. In Japan, Yahoo Japan, which is among the country’s most popular websites, will also show AMP pages.

In a talk today at Google’s AMP developer conference, Google vice president of engineering David Besbris said the addition of the Asian platforms “tremendously increase the reach of where AMP pages can go,” according to a TechCrunch report.

Google launched the AMP page format in the fall of 2015 in attempt to speed up the mobile web — and also to combat Facebook’s speedy Instant Articles, which debuted that spring. (The AMP logo even looks a little Facebooky.)

AMP pages were initially designed for sites that displayed content — e.g. news sites — but their usage has expanded since Google introduced the format. Google last summer began displaying AMP pages in its mobile search results and expanded into areas such as e-commerce with eBay, Fandango, and more.

Google is holding a AMP development conference, its first for the product, over today and tomorrow in New York. You can follow along on Twitter with #AMPconf to hear Google and those who use AMP extol its greatness.

One of the speakers this morning was Guardian developer Natalia Baltazar who explained how the paper had benefited from AMP:

Others, however, took a more skeptical view of the proceedings:

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Nothing against the “Death Star,” but the LA Times thinks its new daily news podcast can go where the biggies can’t
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